Waterwise hedging

Water restrictions hit us hard last year in the Western Cape, but the desire from clients for neat hedging didn’t disappear with the water. Landscape designers and landscapers needed to be more creative with the inclusion of water-wise plants in their designs and specifically for hedging aspects. The trend that has caught on and remained, is the use of Portucularia as hedging. It has neat...
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Vertical shapes

Preferences for planting using vertical shapes has increased in popularity over the past year. The use of tall cactus in rows, or mother-in-laws tongue en masse, or grasses of varying colours and heights are being used more and more in the gardens being landscaped by professionals. The consistency of similar shapes and lines create a dramatic effect. The vertical lines create a sense of...
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Greened geometric pavers

Soften your stepping stones, or geometrically placed pavers with a little greenery inbetween. Modern large pavers equally spaced would be best with between 70 – 100mm of greening space between that can be planted up with the most appropriate ground cover. Wonder lawn (Dichondra repens), Viola (Viola pallens), soleirolii (Soleirolia soleirolii), penny royal (Mentha pulegium), dwarf mondo...
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Row of tree stems

Make a statement with your trees, by planting them equi-distant apart, strip their straight stem to about shoulder height, and let the foliage branch out above this point. Plant a low, neat hedge line below to accent the tree trunks and to draw your eye along the line to a focal point. And then light up the row of trees with spot lights from below to provide the accent of the stems and the light...
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Bougainvillea tree

Modern, colourful and decorative use of a cerise bougainvillea plant that is trained to grow up the inside of curved rebar arbors to flourish in a dash of colour. These feature trees can be found in the Central Garden of The Getty Center, Los Angeles, CA.
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Gardens become vertical

It is always great to hear about new and exciting things being created by landscape designers globally, and the vertical garden is just one such concept that can now be seen in South Africa. The world was first exposed to this botanical wonder when French botanist Patrick Blanc covered a wall, situated behind the Eiffel Tower, in plants. Leon Kluge (a landscape architect in Nelspruit) brought...
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